Osteopathy East, 41 Mare Street, Cordwainer House, London, E8 4RP.
T:07903 830 743

 
 
image image image

What Jarvia Treats

Jarvia enjoys treating patients of all ages and for a wide variety of conditions.

She treats new/acute injuries as well as chronic problems.

Many of her patients seek treatment to improve their recovery from injury or to maintain good health and function.

Osteopaths treat more than you think. They can treat the whole body and many conditions.

Below is advice and information about the Benefits of Osteopathy; Back Pain; Sports Injuries; Fitness to work; and Getting older.


Common symptoms treated by Jarvia

  • Pain
  • Stiffness
  • Tingling/Pins and needles
  • Numbness
  • Loss of strength
  • Tension
  • Restricted mobility
  • Injury recovery

Common conditions treated by Jarvia

  • Lower back pain & upper back pain
  • Neck pain
  • Shoulder, arm, elbow, forearm, wrist and hand problems
  • Pelvis, hip, buttock, thigh, knee, leg, ankle and foot problems
  • Disc injuries
  • Joint pain
  • Muscle injury and muscle pain
  • RSI
  • Whiplash
  • Arthritis
  • Pregnancy related problems
  • Postural problems
  • Sports injuries
  • Sciatica
  • Tennis Elbow
  • Headache
  • Jaw (TMJ) dysfunction
  • Sinusitis
  • Chest complaints
  • Stress and fatigue

What are the benefits of Osteopathy for your general health?

Osteopaths respect the body's natural ability as a self-regulating mechanism and usually only intervene when pain or discomfort is present. The benefits of osteopathy are the general improvement in mobility and structural stability of the body and of course reducing and eliminating symptoms. In turn, other systems of the body such as the circulatory and nervous systems function more effectively. For a number of general conditions, minimal treatment is required.

With our lives becoming increasingly busy, yet more sedentary, Osteopaths can offer prevention advice such as stretching exercises, lifting techniques, posture, breathing and stress reduction which is a great way for individuals to maintain their own health. In addition some lifestyle changes including diet or workplace ergonomics can dramatically improve ones health and reduce ongoing health costs.

Early intervention by an Osteopath means you can be aware of potential sources of referred pain, and how you can make changes to your lifestyle now, so you won't have to deal with the pain later on.

Preventing injuries means less time off work and therefore more time keeping active and enjoying the benefits of general good health.

Back Pain

Trouble with your back does not simply produce pain in the back. Often it may cause symptoms in more remote areas such as the buttocks, groin, hips, and legs (commonly called sciatica).

Problems in the spine and neck can also cause symptoms such as dizziness, headaches, clicking jaw, pins and needles and many more. Indeed research has shown that problems related to the back may affect over 60% of the UK’s population at some stage in their lives.

Osteopaths are trained professionals who are skilled in diagnosing problems, including those which may require further investigation if necessary. Around 30,000 people currently consult osteopaths every working day with more than seven million consultations carried out every year (General Osteopathic Council).

NICE (the National Institute of Clinical Excellence) guidelines recommend manipulative therapies including osteopathy for the treatment of low back pain.

Your treatment

Osteopaths use a wide range of gentle manipulations, depending on your age, fitness and diagnosis. Treatment is different for every patient but may include techniques such as different types of soft tissue massage and joint articulation to release tension, stretch muscles, help relieve pain and mobilise your joints. Sometimes, when we move joints you may hear a ‘click’. This is just like the click people get when they crack their knuckles.

Keeping a healthy spine and joints

When young, the body can adapt easily to the stress and strain it is put under. As it grows older (over 25 years!) it begins to lose some of the elasticity which gives the body the flexibility to cope and adapt. In particular this applies to the discs between the vertebrae and the joint cartilage. These require regular movement to ensure their maximum range and thereby increase local circulation and nutrition to the surrounding fluids and tissues.


10 top tips for back care

  1. Keep moving and stretching.
  2. Take regular exercise.
  3. Take frequent breaks between repetitive tasks and vary the rhythm.
  4. Change position – avoid ‘computer hump’.
  5. Pace yourself when the work is heavy e.g. gardening.
  6. Adjust car seats, and on long journeys, have breaks and stretch.
  7. Watch children’s posture – don’t let them carry bags on one shoulder.
  8. Avoid strain when lifting especially when shopping and with small children.
  9. Is your bed the right bed or is it getting old?
  10. Seek osteopathic advice earlier rather than later.

Sports Injuries

Preventing Injuries

Sports activities are a regular way of life for many of us now, and involve people from across all age groups from those who have an avid interest to those who just wish to keep fit; from the elite professional to the casual participant. Many of the injuries are the result of overuse i.e. playing too hard and too often e.g. tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow, and biceps tendinitis, or from not warming up properly beforehand or from not warming down after exercise.

Sometimes incorrect equipment can lead to injuries – ill-fitting footwear can cause hip, knee and foot injuries (e.g. Achilles injuries). Reduced joint flexibility will affect the degree of performance and may result in injury if the player is unaware that they cannot perform to the same level as they used to, for example golfers who cannot turn at the waist as well as they used to, and the enthusiastic older footballer whose knees do not bend as well as they once did.

Young people especially are vulnerable in sport as their growing bodies are often expected to perform to high standards and are putting exceptional physical demands on themselves. The good news is that although sports injuries are common, those who are fit tend to recover more quickly and easily from their injuries.

How Osteopathy can help

An osteopath can help improve performance as well as treat the injuries being suffered.

By using their knowledge of diagnosis and highly developed palpatory skills they can help to restore structural balance, improve joint mobility and reduce adhesions and soft tissue restrictions so that ease of movement is restored and performance enhanced.

For those of you wishing to keep fit, the osteopath can help you keep supple and improve muscle tone so reducing the risk of injury to soft tissues unaccustomed to the extra work they are being asked to do. Advice on diet and exercise which will help you with your specific sport may also be offered.

Remember

  • Begin slowly and build up, especially after an injury.
  • Warm up first, and then warm down with stretches afterwards.
  • Drink plenty of water when exercising.
  • Exercise regularly, and try to alternate the types of exercise that you are doing every day.
  • Following a joint injury apply ice to the area for 10 minutes, every hour, if practical. Apply a bandage to compress the tissues. Elevate and rest if possible.

Work and Driving problems

Are you fit for work?

Occupational injuries account for many millions of working days lost each year in Britain. No matter whether your work is in the office or outside on the land you need to be able to cope with the individual demands made on your body by the style of work you do. Manual work inevitably carries the inherent risk of injury caused by heavy and often awkward lifting, overstretching, and periods of prolonged bending causing back and disc injuries, sciatica, and muscle strains. In the office where desk work is more common, there are the dangers of ‘computer hump’ and ‘mouse wrist’, whilst frequent telephone use affects the neck and shoulders causing headaches and carpal tunnel syndrome etc. Those who drive for a living need to be aware of their driving position as it affects not only their back, neck and shoulders but also can affect hips, knees and feet. Ask an osteopath for advice on the correct driving position for you and any exercises which may help.

For the Employee

Going to an osteopath demonstrates to your boss that you are taking an active role in trying to improve your health and reduce your injury. The osteopath will help you look at the style of work you are undertaking and help you find ways of improving the situation and how to prevent a recurrence of your injuries. You will be treated and offered advice on posture and lifting. An osteopath can also provide you with a fit note.

For the Employer

Osteopathic treatment will usually help to resolve work-related injuries earlier so that your workforce is more efficient and productive and it will reduce time off through ill-health. Some companies already benefit from using an osteopath as part of their care programme for employees thereby improving morale and increasing productivity.

Useful tips

  • Frequent short breaks away from the desk and computer will help avoid back, neck and eye strain.
  • Make sure if you are driving that you make time to stop, get out and do some brisk exercise for a few minutes every so often on a long journey.
  • When lifting at work judge whether you can do this safely or whether you need help. Never be afraid to ask for assistance.

Getting older – staying active

Retirement can bring time for leisure, travel opportunities and interests to the older person. This is the chance to take up those sports and activities that you never had time for whilst working and bringing up your family, e.g. golf, gardening, badminton, fitness classes etc. The body, however, has changed. It has lost some of its elasticity and ability to adapt. It has also experienced injuries and postural stress during those years, often resulting in repetitive strain injuries, stiffness and degenerative changes.

The onset of health issues such as high blood pressure, digestive and circulatory disorders and arthritis have all begun to have a noticeable effect on the body’s energy and ability to perform. Many grandparents also help working parents by caring for their grandchildren – a pleasure for many but also a strain on the older body.

Quality of life is especially important for this age group when there are increasing concerns about loss of independence and mobility.

Keeping healthy

Osteopathy can help greatly during this time. An osteopath will take a full case history so they can understand how the body has been affected so far. Then, after a full examination and assessment the osteopath will be able to offer treatment and advice to help improve mobility, circulation and immune function, and reduce joint stiffness so that the older person can enjoy a full and active life in retirement.

The treatment is usually gentle and aims to maintain health and prevent further injury. Dietary advice may also be given to help maintain healthy bones and joints.

Remember

  • Gentle stretching daily to help maintain tissue elasticity and joint mobility.
  • Walk as much as possible to keep circulation healthy and maintain muscle tone.
  • Have a daily rest to recover energy for the rest of the day’s activities.
  • The use of trainers or similar footwear can help to reduce wear and tear to the knee and hip joints, and can also help reduce back pain when walking on hard pavements.